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How to handle heat emergencies

How to handle heat emergencies

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. While Arkansans are used to hot summers, the recent weeks of temperatures with heat indies in the triple digits, has been a stamina test for most.  Now, with the addition of air temperatures exceeding 100 degrees forecast for the week, additional attention is asked for what could be life threatening heat related concerns.

With an understanding that illness caused by too much heat or too much activity in the sun can be easily dismissed, as the person being affected may be unaware they are nearing points of concern, the following signals and care for heat conditions are as follows:

Signals of Heat Emergencies...

  • Heat exhaustion: Cool, moist, pale, or flushed skin; heavy sweating; headache; nausea or vomiting; dizziness; and exhaustion.

Protect yourself from the threat of West Nile virus

Protect yourself from the threat of West Nile virus

Positive lab results for human cases of West Nile virus (WNV) have been reported in Texas and Mississippi so far this year, and the virus is probably on its way to Arkansas, health officials say.

The Arkansas Department of Health (ADH) has not recorded any cases of WNV infection so far this year, but ADH officials say that it is only a matter of time.

 According to James Phillips, MD, Infectious Disease Branch Chief at ADH, it is not surprising to see illness from mosquitoes at this time of year. “We are concerned that people may have forgotten that WNV is a problem in Arkansas, but the fact is, we have had the greatest number of cases in the months of August and September over the last few years,” Phillips said.

“We want people to remember to take their mosquito repellent with them when they go outside this summer,” Phillips added.

In Arkansas for 2010 there were seven cases of WNV and one fatality recorded.

How sodium, potassium affect your health

How sodium, potassium affect your health

A new study shows that a diet high in sodium and low in potassium doubles the risk of dying from a heart attack and is associated with a 50% increased risk of death from any cause.  The study recorded the diet of 12,000 U.S.

Celebrate an injury-free Independence Day

Celebrate an injury-free Independence Day

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. – Fireworks stands across the state are starting to do big business as Arkansans prepare to celebrate the Independence Day weekend.

Because Attorney General Dustin McDaniel hopes everyone has a safe and happy holiday, he issued these safety tips to remind Arkansans about state laws concerning fireworks.

Third ozone advisory issued for central Arkansas

Third ozone advisory issued for central Arkansas

What:
An Ozone Action Advisory has been declared for June 29, 2011.  The ozone forecast is orange, which means that outdoor activities may be unhealthy for sensitive groups.
 
When:
Wednesday, June 29, 2011.
 
Who:
Counties affected include: Pulaski, Faulkner, Lonoke and Saline. Active children and adults, as well as people with respiratory diseases such as asthma, should limit prolonged outdoor exposure.
 
More:
Those most at risk to ozone exposure include – children, the elderly, and persons with breathing problems.  High ozone concentrations may reduce visibility, aggravate pre-existing respiratory illnesses and even cause symptoms in normally healthy persons who engage in strenuous physical activity outdoors. Symptoms of ozone exposure may include shortness of breath, coughing, wheezing, headaches, nausea and eye and throat irritation.

Take precautions against melanoma

Take precautions against melanoma

HOT SPRINGS, Ark. – With summer heat already scorching Arkansas, there are precautions you can take to help prevent a melanoma, a dangerous type of skin cancer and the leading cause of death from skin disease.

“Early detection is the key. That’s why people with a high risk need to see a dermatologist from time to time. If you detect it early, you can prevent the spreading of it,” said Dr. P.K. Reddy, medical oncologist at the Mercy Cancer Center in Hot Springs, Ark.

When people spend time in sunlight, cells called melanocytes make more of a skin pigment called melanin. This causes the skin to tan. But if the skin receives too much ultraviolet light, the melanocytes may begin to grow abnormally and become cancerous, a condition referred to as a melanoma.

Have fun at Cabot Health Fair

Have fun at Cabot Health Fair

When: Thursday, June 9 from 4 - 9 pm

Where: Mt. Carmel Baptist Church

Come for great food and fun. It’s all free! Play and learn with the Arkansas Department of Health, Arkansas Children’s Hospital, Game and Fish Commission, the Cabot Fire Department, UAMS, A Woman’s Place, Centennial Bank, and many other local businesses!

Everyone is welcome! Contact Kim Helmbeck at (501) 605-3612 for more information.