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It takes all blood types to help save lives

It takes all blood types to help save lives

LITTLE ROCK, Ark.  — Whether someone is among the 39 percent of the U.S. population with type O positive blood or the 2 percent with B negative, the American Red Cross is looking for eligible donors of all types to give blood this summer to help avert a shortage.

Those with O negative, A negative and B negative are especially urged to donate, as their blood types are often in high demand because they can potentially be transfused to both Rh negative and positive patients. O negative is the universal blood type and can potentially be transfused to any patient.

Vacations, activities and holidays contribute to a decrease in donations during the summer, but patients don’t get a break from needing blood. Visit the Summer of Stories campaign website, redcrossblood.org/summer, to make an appointment to donate, then share why you give blood and watch videos about people whose lives have been touched by donors.

Protect yourself during tick season

Protect yourself during tick season

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. — Arkansas has some of the highest levels of tick-related illnesses of any state in the nation and we are expecting another big year. In 2012, over 900 cases of tick-related illness were reported to the Arkansas Department of Health (ADH). Five of these cases resulted in death. Cases were found in 63 counties, with illnesses occurring every month of the year but peaking in June. Because many of these illnesses go unreported, the actual number of persons sick from tick-related illness is much higher.

According to Susan Weinstein, DVM, MPH, Zoonotic Disease Section Chief at ADH, “Tick-related illnesses are serious and can be deadly if not treated properly. It is very important that people realize the seriousness of the infections that some ticks can carry, and to see their doctor if ill. Thankfully, we can prevent many of these infections if we become aware of the risks and take some simple precautions.”

Blood donations needed to respond to emergencies

Blood donations needed to respond to emergencies

 

LITTLE ROCK, Ark. (Jan. 15, 2013) — Like the emergency room of a hospital, the American Red Cross must be prepared to respond to patient emergencies with blood products 24 hours a day, seven days a week and 365 days a year. Through the dedication of blood donors, the Red Cross can be prepared day in and day out, no matter when or where blood is needed.

 

Readily available blood helps save the lives of people like David Zien, who was on his way home on his motorcycle when the SUV in front of him lost control during a lane change and flipped onto its side, sending Zien nearly 350 feet. He was transported by helicopter to a hospital, where he received 32 pints of blood. Today, Zien says he attributes much of his survival to the generosity of blood donors.

 

All blood types are currently needed. For more information and to make an appointment, visit redcrossblood.org or call 1-800-RED CROSS.

 

Pulaski Tech gets approval for Anesthesia Technology program

Pulaski Technical College recently received approval for its Anesthesia Technology program from the American Society of Anesthesia Technologists and Technicians (ASATT).

 This approval allows students in the program to take the Anesthesia Technologist Certification Exam, which they must successfully pass before they can work as anesthesia technologists.

 Pulaski Tech offers the program in partnership with Arkansas Children’s Hospital. Anesthesia technologists have traditionally been trained on-the-job, but in order to be certified, they must now have a college degree. At Pulaski Tech, anesthesia technology is one of six options offered through the Associate of Applied Science in Allied Health. The degree requires 61 credit hours that include classroom work and on-site clinicals.

Schools, Health Department offer flu vaccines for K-12

Schools, Health Department offer flu vaccines for K-12

(LITTLE ROCK) —The Arkansas Department of Health (ADH), the Arkansas Department of Education (ADE) and local school districts statewide are again offering the seasonal flu vaccine to school children in grades K-12 beginning the week of October 8. School clinics will be going on for the next several months.

Seasonal flu vaccine is not required for children to attend school, but it is highly recommended.  The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and the American Academy of Pediatricians (AAP) recommend everyone aged 6 months and older receive a seasonal flu vaccine every year.  Seasonal flu causes children to miss school and their parents to miss work.   If you have insurance, the ADH will ask your insurance company to pay for the cost of giving the vaccine.  If you do not have insurance or your insurance company does not pay, the shot will be no charge to you.

UAMS report: Blacks at 'significantly higher' risk of death from cancer, HIV

UAMS report: Blacks at 'significantly higher' risk of death from cancer, HIV

Health Status of African-Americans Detailed in  UAMS College of Public Health Report

LITTLE ROCK – Mortality rates of African-Americans were significantly higher than those of Caucasians for most cancers, HIV and homicide, but lower for motor vehicle crashes and suicide, according to a recent report compiled by the University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) Fay W. Boozman College of Public Health.

That’s just one of many findings detailed in a joint study focusing on the health status of African-Americans in Arkansas compiled by UAMS and supported by the Arkansas Minority Health Commission (AMHC), the Arkansas Center for Health Disparities and the Arkansas Prevention Research Center. The full report can be found here: www.uams.edu/coph/reports/ or www.arminorityhealth.com/reports_updates.html.

Cabot needs your blood!

Cabot needs your blood!

CABOT, Ark. (KTHV) -- Red Cross will be having a blood drive on July 20th from 2 p.m. to 6 p.m. The drive will be held at Kroger located on 129 West Main Street. All blood types are needed, so come out and donate for a good cause.